Failure does not occur when you put 225 on the bench press, lift it for 6 times and because you can’t get it up for the 7th rep, you stop. Many people refer to that as failure. They may be uncomfortable at that present moment in time but definitely not realizing what their muscle is actually capable of once they unlock their minds to allow their bodies to go beyond.

So let’s refer back to the previous example of the 225 pound bench press. Stopping after 6 may mean you have failed to perform 225 anymore, but think logically here. Isn’t it possible that you could perform 220 for 1? And then 210 for another? And then 200 for 2 additional reps? And so on down the line? The answer is yes! To all of the above. That means your muscle technically has not reached absolute failure when failing to complete rep 6. Your muscle still has juice left in it to continue to work. So theoretically, failure would have to mean that you’ve worked your muscle so hard that you couldn’t lift 1 more pound off of your chest. Obviously that is unrealistic, but do you get my point? You’ve got to apply more effort than what you are currently doing.

Do this with intensity sets, drop sets, strip sets, peak contraction reps, pause contraction reps, negative reps, forced reps, etc.

As you can see above, I did 235 for as many times as I could, then went straight to 185 then straight to 135 with no rest. This was a strip set. I really try to do something like this on every exercise.

When I started incorporating these kinds of sets, that’s when I really noticed a drastic change in my body and my muscular endurance.

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